Edible fruits and berries (and some poisonous ones too) 3


We’re at the end of August now, a fantastic time to forage for the many edible fruits and berries that nature provides us.  What’s the difference between fruits and berries I hear you say?  Botanically speaking, fruits are the seed bearing structure of flowering plants; berries are a type of fruit, ones where the fruit is produced from a single ovary.  For most of us the definition of whether something is a berry or a fruit is much less important than how it tastes, and even less important than whether it’s edible or not!

I’ve written this post to explain which fruits and berries are edible and which aren’t; it isn’t intended to be an identification guide, although I’ve included tips on where it grows and photos.  Use good tree and plant identification books to help you out.

A note on berries: I know that many people say that you should never eat red berries but that is a myth, a myth that is both misleading and potentially dangerous.  On the one hand there are many red berries that are edible (see below) and by following this mantra you would miss out on them.  But the flip side is that people often assume that you can eat berries that aren’t red; this is entirely false and could prove fatal.  So rather than rely on twee sayings, I’d suggest putting in the time to learn which are edible and which aren’t!

Crab apples

Crab apples (Malus sylvestris) grow throughout the British Isles, usually singly, and has a preference for heavy, well drained soils.  The apples are very tart and generally not considered suitable for eating raw.  We tend to use them in jams and jellies, such as in this apple and blackberry jam.  Or you could use them in a wild marjoram jelly.
fruit and nuts | foraging | Kent | south east | London

Rosehips

These are the red berries found on wild roses.  They can be found across the British Isles and are often found in hedgerows.  Here in Kent the species we come across most frequently is probably dog rose (Rosa canina).  Rosehips contain high quantities of Vitamin C, indeed during the 2nd World War people were encouraged to scour the hedgerows and collect them up.  They need to be processed ideally, such as in this recipe for rosehip and crab apple jelly, but certainly make sure that you remove the seed before eating as the microscopic hairs on the seed will cause irritation if swallowed.

Also note in the photo below the berries of black bryony (Dioscorea communis sometimes referred to as Tamus communis); these are the ones on the right hand side of the photo that are more spherical and glossy.

fruit and nuts | foraging | Kent | south east | London

Rowan

Rowan (Sorbus aucuparia) is a small tree found throughout the British Isles although it is most common in the north and west.  Often it’s known as mountain ash due to its liking of high places and the similarity of the leaf to ash, but they aren’t related.  The berries grow in bunches and vary between orange and red.  They are delicious when made into a jam .

fruit and nuts | foraging | Kent | south east | London

Whitebeam

Whitebeam (Sorbus aria) is a close relative of rowan with a paler berry, sometimes slightly orangey.  They are rare in the wild but we are fortunate to have lots of them in and around our ancient woodland camp.  The berries are edible but need to be cooked before eating.  The tree is relatively easy to identify from its leaf, which is pale green on top and silvery white on the underside (from which the tree derives its name).

 

Elderberries

Elder (Sambucus nigra) is another common small tree found all around the British Isles.  Whilst it prefers chalky soil, it will grow pretty much anywhere, in fact Nicola and I had one grow through a crack in the pavement at the front of our house.  The berries are about the size of a petit pois and very dark purple.  Be cautious as they can have a laxative affect.  They work well as a syrup or mixed with blackberries to make a cordial.

fruit and nuts | foraging | Kent | south east | London

Haws

Haws are the red berries that grow on hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna), which is regarded as either a shrub or small tree; with that said, I’ve seen several hawthorn that approached 10m in height.  They’re probably best consumed as a fruit leather or as a sauce. We’ve also used them to make a hawthorn tincture, an alcohol based herbal remedy, which has been shown to strengthen the heart muscles.

fruit and nuts | foraging | Kent | south east | London

Sea buckthorn

A shrub or small tree found on the coast, the berries of Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) can be eaten raw but I find them to be too astringent (think cheeks sucked in!).  Another that is probably best turned into a jam or jelly for consumption.
fruit and nuts | foraging | Kent | south east | London

Wild cherry

We’ve got lots of wild cherry (Prunus avium) in and around our ancient woodland camp.  The fruits are somewhat smaller than their cultivated cousins but the main issue is getting to them before the birds.  Wild cherry tends to fruit earlier than other trees, often in June.  The photo below is of unripened berries.

fruit and nuts | foraging | Kent | south east | London

Wayfaring Tree

The Wayfaring Tree (Viburnum lantana) is a small tree common in hedgerows in the south east of England, becoming less common as you move north or west.  I’ve come across a couple of accounts of people eating the berries in famine situations but the perceived wisdom seems to be that they are mildly toxic and cause vomiting and diarrhoea.  I’ve never tried them so have no first hand experience on the matter!
fruit and nuts | foraging | Kent | south east | London

Sloes

Sloes grow on blackthorn (Prunus spinosa), a common hedgerow tree.   They can be found across the British Isles although in my experience more so in the west, where they tend to be used to keep livestock in.  The berries are somewhat sharp and are best used in either a jam or for sloe gin or vodka.  After the last batch of sloe vodka we made, Nicola squeezed the pips out of the fruit and coated them in chocolate, a fantastic liqueur.

fruit and nuts | foraging | Kent | south east | London

Plums

Plums (Prunus domestica ssp. domestica) aren’t native but are found all around the British isles, generally near past or present human settlement.  We’ve recently made this delicious plum ketchup.

fruit and nuts | foraging | Kent | south east | London

Damson

The origins of damsons (Prunus domestica ssp. insititia) is uncertain,  It isn’t a native but certainly has been cultivated in the British Isles for a very long time.  Some argue that it is a cross between a sloe and plum, others that it is a variety of sloe alone.  Whatever might be correct, they are worth keeping an eye out for.  Some are often sharp and need to be cooked, some are sweeter and can be eaten raw.

fruit and nuts | foraging | Kent | south east | London

Yew

Yew (Taxus baccata) is one of 3 conifers native to the British Isles and is most common in the south; it’s also common in churchyards throughout the British Isles.   Whilst we refer to the yew having a berry, it isn’t a true fruit but in fact a modified cone called an aril.  All parts of yew are toxic with the exception of the berry – but not the seed inside, which is toxic.  The aril is glutinous and quite sweet.

fruit and nuts | foraging | Kent | south east | London

Guelder rose

Guelder rose (Viburnum opulus) is common throughout the British Isles preferring heavy soil; it’s scarce where we are but there are the odd one or two about.  The berries contain Vitamin C but they must be cooked before you eat them.  Even then there are some reports of people suffering from diarrhoea and/or vomiting after consuming.

fruit and nuts | foraging | Kent | south east | London

Blackberries

Not much to say about blackberries really, other than that they are delicious!
blackberries | foraging | Kent | south east | London

Toxic berries

It would be remiss to not include toxic berries, here’s some of them.

Honeysuckle

Honeysuckle (Lonicera) is a vine like plant and consists of around 100 species that are found in the northern hemisphere.

The berries aren’t always red and can vary in colour including white, yellow, blue and black.

The berries on some species are toxic and can cause vomiting, diarrhea, sweats, dilated pupils and increased heartbeat. If ingested in large quantities, the berries can cause respiratory failure, convulsions and coma.  According to the Toxicological Centres in Berlin and Zurich, you need to eat around 30 berries for the minor symptoms to appear.

Dogwood

Dogwood (Cornus sanguinea) is a UK native tree, although the name Dogwood is given to around 60 species in the family.  They can be found in most temperate zones of the northern hemisphere.

I’ve read mixed reports on the toxicity of Cornus sanguinea, with claims that they are toxic and can cause vomiting to claims that they’ve been eaten with no ill effect, although they are very bitter (this later claim is confirmed in The Colour Atlas of Poisonous Plants by Frohne and Pfander, which also notes that there are no reports of poisoning from eating the berries).

I’ve never tried them and due to this uncertainty put them in the ‘leave alone’ category.

Tutsan

Tutsan (Hypericum androsaemum) is a member of the St John’s Wort family.  All parts of the plant are toxic due to the presence of hypericin which can cause nausea and diarrhoea; the berries are especially toxic.

Lords & Ladies

Lords & Ladies (Arum maculatum) contain calcium oxalate crystals which can irritate the skin and cause inflamation and blistering.  I’ve bitten into a leaf to see what would happen; immeadiately my tongue and lips started to tingle so I spat it out again.  But the tingling lasted for several hours before fading away with no other effects.   I’m led to believe the same thing happens with the berries.  Eating large quantities of this plant can cause severe gastro-enteritis ending in coma and death.

Bittersweet

Bittersweet (Solanum dulcamara) creeps and crawls its way through the hedgerows.

The berries contain solanine, a toxic alkaloid.  Symptoms of solanine poisoning include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach cramps and burning of the throat; these symptoms can take up to 19 hours to manifest.  In more severe cases, hallucinations, paralysis, fever, jaundice and death have been reported.  You can die from eating moderate quantities of solanine (6mg/kg body weight).

It’s worth noting that the amount of solinine is highest when the berries are green and decreases as the berries ripen until they only contain traces of solinine.  Fatal cases are extremely rare.

Holly

Holly (Illex aquifolium) is a deciduous tree that retains its leaves in the winter.  Most of us are familiar with its spiny leaves and red berries.  It’s a member of a large genus of around 480 species that have a wide distribution.  Eating of the berries has been most frequently reported in children.  I’ve seen a few claims that eating more than 20 berries is fatal in children but have been unable to find the source of this claim and in fact information on the toxicity of holly berries is scarce.  It is thought that the berries contains a digitalis like chemical as well as triterpene compounds.  Symptoms are abdominal pains, vomitting and diarrhea; there are no recorded cases of death in modern literature.

bushcraft | foraging | berries | Kent | south east

Black Bryony

Black bryony (Dioscorea communis sometimes referred to as Tamus communis) conatin calcium oxylate (similar to Lords & Ladies discussed below) and touching the leaves and stems can cause irritation of the skin.  Eating the berries can induce severe irritation of the stomach and intestinesseizures and kidney failureSee the section above on rosehips for a photo.

Spindle

Spindle (Euonymus europaeus) will grow all over the British Isles but has a preference for chalky soils and seems to like the edges of woods and hedgerows.  It‘s leaves are similar to Dogwood but the fruits are unmistakable.

Due to the colour and shape of the berries they are especially attractive to children and many cases of eating them have been recorded.  Fortunately in recent times only cases involving mild poisoning have been recorded.  Symptoms include severe diarrhea and fever; these symptoms can take 8 – 15 hours to manifest themselves.

As a reminder on berries you can and can’t eat:

I haven’t included photos of all of these trees and plants so you’ll need to do a little more identification still, but as a summary this should be useful.

Edible red berries

Toxic red berries

Edible black berries

Toxic black berries

Hawthorn Bittersweet Elder Ivy
Rowan Bryony Damson Tutsan
Whitebeam Holly Sloes Nightshade
Rosehips Wayfaring Tree Billberry Dogwood (inedible)
Cherry Spindle Blackberries
Sea buckthorn Honeysuckle (some species)
Guelder rose (when cooked) Lords & Ladies
Yew (but not the seed inside)

We look at many of these fruits and berries on our 1 day foraging course.

You can see loads of photos from the day, as well as from all of our courses, on our Facebook page.


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About Gary

Lead Instructor at Jack Raven Bushcraft, teaching bushcraft, wilderness and survival skills to groups and individuals.

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