Conifers


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Lawson's Cypress
Giant Redwood
Incense Cedar
Sitka Spruce
Bhutan Pine
Thuja
Patagonian Cypress
Spanish Fir
Monterey Cypress
Tiger Tail Spruce
Japanese Douglas Fir
Jeffrey Pine
Oriental Pine
Leylandii
Western Hemlock
Juniper
Monterey Pine
Giant Redwood
Chinese Fir
Nootka
Jeza Spruce
Chinese fir
Japanese Red Cedar
Sequoia
Umbrella Pine
Taiwania
Big Cone Douglas Fir
Stone Pine
Western Himalayan Pine
Western Red Cedar
Japanese Red Cedar (2).jpg
Noble Fir
Coast Redwood
Swamp Cypress & Dawn Redwood
Scots Pine
Eastern Hemlock
Brewers Spruce
Montezuma Pine
Sitka Spruce
Corsican Pine
Lawson Cypress
Juniper
Norway Spruce
Maritime Pine
Carolina Hemlock
Leylandii
Larch
Western Hemlock
Sequoia
Dawn Cedar
Lots of cones
Dunkeld Larch
Norway Spruce
Deodar Cedar
Cedar of Lebanon
Oriental Spruce
Douglas Fir
Incense Cedar
Lawson's Cypress
Giant Redwood
Incense Cedar
Sitka Spruce
Bhutan Pine
Thuja
Patagonian Cypress
Spanish Fir
Monterey Cypress
Tiger Tail Spruce
Japanese Douglas Fir
Jeffrey Pine
Oriental Pine
Leylandii
Western Hemlock
Juniper

Conifers

We’ve always been lovers of traditional broadleaf woodland.  Most of the conifers we encountered were in plantations, where they’d been planted to produce timber in a short time frame.  Conifer plantations can seem sterile compared to a broadleaf woodland, with the floor devoid of anything other than needles and the odd wood ant colony.  Often trees fall over because they have a shallow root system.  Still, they can be a useful resource for our bushcraft (although we don’t have any in our ancient woodland), and make shelter building straightforward as well as firewood collection easy, but overall, we prefer broadleaf.

After a visit to Bedgebury Pinetum a few years back, and seeing conifers left to grow as they would in the wild, we changed our minds a little about them.  Some of the trees were stunning and looked nothing like their cousins in a plantation, for example the western hemlock was nothing like the ones we were familiar with from plantations such as Clowes Wood.  If you’re into facts and figures, conifers provide the record breakers as far as trees are concerned – the tallest, widest, heaviest, oldest trees are all species of conifer.

You can find loads of photos of our ancient broadleaf woodland, and of our courses, on our Facebook page.